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Yooka-Laylee
I’ve had a few people asking me about Yooka-Laylee, the first game from Playtonic, a tiny developer made up of ex-Rare staff.
I’m guessing people are bugging me about it because I was a concept artist on the least popular of the Banjo Kazooie games, a series to which Yooka-Laylee is the spiritual successor.
Aside from having worked with some of the Playtonic staff during my stint at Rare, I have no connection to the title, nor any inside information about it.
My general opinion of it is: it’s a piece of epic trolling!
With the symbiotic characters, the art style, the googly eyes, even the colour scheme of their logo; the Playtonic guys are basically sticking their finger up at Microsoft and saying “This is what we wanted to be making, not that Kinnect shite you forced us to work on”.
I like that.
I like that a lot.
Best of luck to them!
https://www.playtonicgames.com/
:iconjollyjack:jollyjack
:iconjollyjack:jollyjack 78 58
INSIDE OUT by HINOKI-pastry INSIDE OUT :iconhinoki-pastry:HINOKI-pastry 1,699 93 GUMBALL and PENNY by HINOKI-pastry GUMBALL and PENNY :iconhinoki-pastry:HINOKI-pastry 776 38 Parappa and Sunny by TigerToony Parappa and Sunny :icontigertoony:TigerToony 196 24 Who Does Scooby Doo Meet by TandP Who Does Scooby Doo Meet :icontandp:TandP 248 124 A New Foe is Appearing! (Super Smash Sisters pt 2) by TheBourgyman A New Foe is Appearing! (Super Smash Sisters pt 2) :iconthebourgyman:TheBourgyman 1,258 147 ( PTR ) Parappa the Rapper Roadster Car Tomy Toy by KrazyKari ( PTR ) Parappa the Rapper Roadster Car Tomy Toy :iconkrazykari:KrazyKari 3 0 Super Mario 3D Land Photo Album by AsylusGoji91 Super Mario 3D Land Photo Album :iconasylusgoji91:AsylusGoji91 79 48 johnny bravo bg8 by abstractamit johnny bravo bg8 :iconabstractamit:abstractamit 11 2 Captured! by KazunaPikachu Captured! :iconkazunapikachu:KazunaPikachu 23 25 Daffy Duck: Elder Veneration by dogatemyshrooms Daffy Duck: Elder Veneration :icondogatemyshrooms:dogatemyshrooms 119 26 Classic Games by GlaucoSilva Classic Games :iconglaucosilva:GlaucoSilva 96 13 Sleeeeeep by emeraldeyes152000 Sleeeeeep :iconemeraldeyes152000:emeraldeyes152000 732 44 OPPOSITE SEX AVENGERS by JayFosgitt OPPOSITE SEX AVENGERS :iconjayfosgitt:JayFosgitt 913 76 paid a quarter... by edtropolis paid a quarter... :iconedtropolis:edtropolis 179 14 Rayman Rock! by Rayman-freak Rayman Rock! :iconrayman-freak:Rayman-freak 339 1
  • Watching: Ed Edd n Eddy
  • Playing: X-Men
ticgamesnetwork.com/to/retro-f…

Mid-2006 was when I became aware of an announcement that blew me away. A third Super Smash Bros. game was on the horizon. I was already spending hundreds of hours on Super Smash Bros. Melee with my brothers for the past few years before then, so I would already be down to play a sequel. One look at this trailer, though, and I realized just how huge this was going to be. In just the two and a half minutes the trailer spanned, Nintendo fans everywhere learned so much about what was to come.

It’s been ten years since Super Smash Bros. Brawl came out. I repeat: It’s been TEN YEARS since this game was released for the Wii. There has been a successor on two systems, and another is on the way. I just can’t believe it; for the longest time it felt like it didn’t even age a day. Only with the recent advances of technological prowess and clarity do I now think “Okay, yeah, this game does look somewhat pixelated these days.” But back then? You couldn’t tell me the Wii was underpowered compared to the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. Nintendo knew exactly how to up the ante with the power they’ve got, and there is arguably no other game that looked as crisp on the system as Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Super Smash Bros. Melee was already a humongous step up from the Nintendo 64 original, but Brawl was crammed to the brim with stuff to play around in. I don’t even know where I could begin. Do I start with the core Smash Bros. gameplay? Or do I go on to discuss the numerous little features like demos of classic games and the return of virtual trophy collections? It’s like they saw just how much they could fit into Melee with its 9-month development time, and they wanted to see how much more they could fit in an even longer span of time.

How about the thing that coats the entire game, the fanservice? Never has a game felt more like a Nintendo love letter than this, thanks to (among other things) its widened roster of characters and elaborate stage designs. New characters include fan favorites like Wario, Wolf, Ike, and ROB, while series mainstays such as Mario, Link, Kirby, and Samus get brand-new attacks to go with their established movesets. Even third-party newcomers Snake – of Metal Gear fame – and Sonic the Hedgehog get the same kind of celebratory treatment as if they were native Nintendo characters! Stages felt less like simple battlegrounds and more like embodiments of the games they are based on, making it all the harder to want to play on the relatively flat Battlefield and Final Destination. My personal favorite’s the WarioWare stage, where it plays out just like an average marathon of WarioWare microgames.

 

That’s not to say all that is perfect, of course; some elements are better than others in every category. Sonic’s special attack is so overpowered that it alone is a reason why many people stopped turning Smash Ball items on. These attacks are usually avoidable and provide quite the visual flair at times (like Mario’s wavy flames and Captain Falcon running over people with his vehicle in the coolest fashion), but they can be pretty uneven in results. Just look at Jigglypuff’s; she inflates, then deflates. It’s incredibly rare for anyone to be blown off the stage even when standing next to her!

This kind of uselessness can even extend to certain regular attacks. For the most part, they are as effective as they are in previous games in the series. However, there is an oddball or two that’s sprinkled into the mix. Mario’s FLUDD attack come to mind since it just slightly pushes people; it’s a neat callback to Super Mario Sunshine, but is so worthless of a move that I never used it after the first time. And of course, characters tripping all of a sudden becomes a dealbreaker for the most hardcore players out there.

If you were ever fortunate to play Wii and DS games online via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, you’d likely have experienced the horror that was Brawl‘s online play. No ranking data is present, input lag and slowdown were always present, and you were unable to change settings unless you were playing against friends. Mario Kart Wii, which came out a couple months later, completely crapped on this online experience with its own.

Obviously, certain aspects of the gameplay don’t hold up as well as others, but the parts where Super Smash Bros. Brawl shines make some of the biggest everlasting impressions one could ever get from a Wii game. Offline customization options are through the frickin’ roof; you could make players be metal throughout the match, fight with up to 300 HP, and even build a surplus of your own stages with the tools the game provides you in the Stage Builder. They may be blocky, sure, but the possibilities never cease to satisfy. You could attempt to recreate other stages, build ones around games like Tetris, or just make the entire thing an elaborate hazard to troll CPUs with.

Unlockables were also massively increased; not only are the extra stages and trophies present and well accounted for, but now you have all kinds of music to discover, hidden demos for classic games, and stickers for use with the Adventure Mode. Stages now have more than two music tracks that alternate at random, but you can adjust the rate of how often each one could show up when a match takes place on the stage. Not only is the quantity extraordinary, but the compositions themselves are absolutely masterful. Never has the Super Mario Land pyramid theme sounded more epic, nor have the WarioWare songs been so fully realized. We even get to hear a lot of tunes from Sonic‘s history, including the main theme for the disaster that was Sonic ’06. Ahh, memories…

But easily the biggest change-up of all is the Adventure mode. Enter The Subspace Emissary, a big-budget platform-fighter that features an epic plot, cinematic cutscenes, and Nintendo characters coming together to save the world! Other than The Great Maze at the near-end of it, I fell in love with this inclusion. It was practically its own game, yet it serves as mere bonus content in this already-crammed Wii disc! It cemented the idea that Super Smash Bros. Brawl was more than just a Smash Bros.game; it’s the developers’ and Nintendo’s big-hearted Thank You to the fans.

Hardly any other game on the Wii (Heck, maybe even the entire console generation) was as eventful as this behemoth. If Super Smash Bros. Melee didn’t already demonstrate the true potential of the series, Brawl showed the level of effort Nintendo and co. would reach to provide an extraordinary experience. It may be overshadowed nowadays by Super Smash Bros. 4 and the upcoming installment that will be fully revealed by the time of this writing, but Brawl forever remains a shining masterpiece of Nintendo glamour.

Activity


  • Watching: Ed Edd n Eddy
  • Playing: X-Men
ticgamesnetwork.com/to/retro-f…

Mid-2006 was when I became aware of an announcement that blew me away. A third Super Smash Bros. game was on the horizon. I was already spending hundreds of hours on Super Smash Bros. Melee with my brothers for the past few years before then, so I would already be down to play a sequel. One look at this trailer, though, and I realized just how huge this was going to be. In just the two and a half minutes the trailer spanned, Nintendo fans everywhere learned so much about what was to come.

It’s been ten years since Super Smash Bros. Brawl came out. I repeat: It’s been TEN YEARS since this game was released for the Wii. There has been a successor on two systems, and another is on the way. I just can’t believe it; for the longest time it felt like it didn’t even age a day. Only with the recent advances of technological prowess and clarity do I now think “Okay, yeah, this game does look somewhat pixelated these days.” But back then? You couldn’t tell me the Wii was underpowered compared to the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. Nintendo knew exactly how to up the ante with the power they’ve got, and there is arguably no other game that looked as crisp on the system as Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Super Smash Bros. Melee was already a humongous step up from the Nintendo 64 original, but Brawl was crammed to the brim with stuff to play around in. I don’t even know where I could begin. Do I start with the core Smash Bros. gameplay? Or do I go on to discuss the numerous little features like demos of classic games and the return of virtual trophy collections? It’s like they saw just how much they could fit into Melee with its 9-month development time, and they wanted to see how much more they could fit in an even longer span of time.

How about the thing that coats the entire game, the fanservice? Never has a game felt more like a Nintendo love letter than this, thanks to (among other things) its widened roster of characters and elaborate stage designs. New characters include fan favorites like Wario, Wolf, Ike, and ROB, while series mainstays such as Mario, Link, Kirby, and Samus get brand-new attacks to go with their established movesets. Even third-party newcomers Snake – of Metal Gear fame – and Sonic the Hedgehog get the same kind of celebratory treatment as if they were native Nintendo characters! Stages felt less like simple battlegrounds and more like embodiments of the games they are based on, making it all the harder to want to play on the relatively flat Battlefield and Final Destination. My personal favorite’s the WarioWare stage, where it plays out just like an average marathon of WarioWare microgames.

 

That’s not to say all that is perfect, of course; some elements are better than others in every category. Sonic’s special attack is so overpowered that it alone is a reason why many people stopped turning Smash Ball items on. These attacks are usually avoidable and provide quite the visual flair at times (like Mario’s wavy flames and Captain Falcon running over people with his vehicle in the coolest fashion), but they can be pretty uneven in results. Just look at Jigglypuff’s; she inflates, then deflates. It’s incredibly rare for anyone to be blown off the stage even when standing next to her!

This kind of uselessness can even extend to certain regular attacks. For the most part, they are as effective as they are in previous games in the series. However, there is an oddball or two that’s sprinkled into the mix. Mario’s FLUDD attack come to mind since it just slightly pushes people; it’s a neat callback to Super Mario Sunshine, but is so worthless of a move that I never used it after the first time. And of course, characters tripping all of a sudden becomes a dealbreaker for the most hardcore players out there.

If you were ever fortunate to play Wii and DS games online via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, you’d likely have experienced the horror that was Brawl‘s online play. No ranking data is present, input lag and slowdown were always present, and you were unable to change settings unless you were playing against friends. Mario Kart Wii, which came out a couple months later, completely crapped on this online experience with its own.

Obviously, certain aspects of the gameplay don’t hold up as well as others, but the parts where Super Smash Bros. Brawl shines make some of the biggest everlasting impressions one could ever get from a Wii game. Offline customization options are through the frickin’ roof; you could make players be metal throughout the match, fight with up to 300 HP, and even build a surplus of your own stages with the tools the game provides you in the Stage Builder. They may be blocky, sure, but the possibilities never cease to satisfy. You could attempt to recreate other stages, build ones around games like Tetris, or just make the entire thing an elaborate hazard to troll CPUs with.

Unlockables were also massively increased; not only are the extra stages and trophies present and well accounted for, but now you have all kinds of music to discover, hidden demos for classic games, and stickers for use with the Adventure Mode. Stages now have more than two music tracks that alternate at random, but you can adjust the rate of how often each one could show up when a match takes place on the stage. Not only is the quantity extraordinary, but the compositions themselves are absolutely masterful. Never has the Super Mario Land pyramid theme sounded more epic, nor have the WarioWare songs been so fully realized. We even get to hear a lot of tunes from Sonic‘s history, including the main theme for the disaster that was Sonic ’06. Ahh, memories…

But easily the biggest change-up of all is the Adventure mode. Enter The Subspace Emissary, a big-budget platform-fighter that features an epic plot, cinematic cutscenes, and Nintendo characters coming together to save the world! Other than The Great Maze at the near-end of it, I fell in love with this inclusion. It was practically its own game, yet it serves as mere bonus content in this already-crammed Wii disc! It cemented the idea that Super Smash Bros. Brawl was more than just a Smash Bros.game; it’s the developers’ and Nintendo’s big-hearted Thank You to the fans.

Hardly any other game on the Wii (Heck, maybe even the entire console generation) was as eventful as this behemoth. If Super Smash Bros. Melee didn’t already demonstrate the true potential of the series, Brawl showed the level of effort Nintendo and co. would reach to provide an extraordinary experience. It may be overshadowed nowadays by Super Smash Bros. 4 and the upcoming installment that will be fully revealed by the time of this writing, but Brawl forever remains a shining masterpiece of Nintendo glamour.

  • Watching: Aggretsuko
  • Playing: Monopoly for Nintendo Switch
ticgamesnetwork.com/reviews/bl…

Coming a few months after Link-a-Pix ColorBlock-a-Pix Color is Lightwood Games’s latest puzzle game for the Nintendo 3DS. That’s three games in this little series of eShop titles. Fortunately, the games prove to do their formulas justice, and Block-a-Pix is no exception to the unspoken rule.

Graphics

This game looks almost exactly like the last one, so I imagine all three games share the same basic visual style. There’s no expecting any major change-ups from one to the next, for better or for worse. Revealing what the image is at the top screen remains a satisfactory reward for clearing parts of a puzzle.

Audio

The 8-Bit music used here is different, but again, only one piece plays throughout the duration of the Block-a-Pix Color. It’s still a relaxing composition, and the sound design is generally soft on the ears. Nothing bad, but nothing making an impact.

Gameplay

Block-a-Pix plays similarly to the last game; you color the screen strategically according to the numbers that certain colors apply to. This time, you create quadrilateral shapes rather than mere lines. You manipulate them by dragging the sides with the stylus so they can cover more or less of the picture.

What’s interesting about this mechanic is that the solutions are not as obvious as the line-connecting style of play in Link-a-Pix Color was. The challenge is more prominent, making the “Eureka!” moments a bit more satisfying this time around. The challenge doesn’t necessarily pick up to a drastic degree, but the puzzles get larger as they go on, making for there to be more and more ways for you to miscalculate a stylus stroke. And as per usual, there’s a large quantity of puzzles, with a lot of the puzzles themselves being solid time sinks.

Verdict

This all makes for another stellar puzzler on the 3DS. It’s packed with puzzles, and the puzzles are fun to solve. It’s best played from a casual perspective in which you solve a few at a time, but I’m sure that’s the intention. If you haven’t already sunk your teeth into some grid-based puzzles, you could probably get started with Block-a-Pix.

Review copy provided by Lightwood Games

  • Watching: Super Mario All-Stars commercials
  • Playing: Street Fighter Anniversary Collection
ticgamesnetwork.com/to/rc/ryan…

Earlier today, at the time of this writing, I was talking with a friend about the new Wreck-It Ralph 2 trailer. I said I wasn’t disappointed per se when I heard about the movie focusing on the Internet, because I wasn’t sure what to expect from this transition. However, the more we discussed about the film, the more I realized I actually had a lot more to say on the subject than I initially thought. At the risk of sounding like even more of a ranty supernerd than I already am, here’s what I have to say on the matter.

Wreck-It Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks the Internet is the sequel to 2012’s love letter to retro games. When it was first announced a sequel was under way, they said that it would possibly focus on console gaming and connecting online through them. At first, I was on board with this. When the first trailer popped up, however, I raised a few suspicions. Now that the second trailer is here, I think those suspicions have been confirmed.

The reason why The Emoji Movie crashed and burned on a critical scale is because it seemed to be written solely by executives with the intention of pandering to today’s kids. It wasn’t focused on telling a story but rather on shoving as many advertisements and modern technology as possible as a means to tell kids that they know what they like. Even though the execution couldn’t be further from that target.

Why did Wreck-It Ralph work, then? Easy: It may have been based around video games – and kids do like video games – but that wasn’t the focus. The video game theme, through all its bells and whistles, was just a foundation for the story to take place within. Even then, the video games and franchises that were represented in the movie were clearly not chosen by focus groups or executives. I’m 100% certain no one in the higher-ups ever said “You know who should be in this movie? That guy from Tapper. Kids these days play Tapper, right?”

They are all ’80s/’90s games that the creators themselves had fond memories of playing. Therefore, they were able to work with the theme in the way they wanted to, without any confusion or tangled messages (barring that a lot of the movie took place in a candy world filled with snack references and puns). They made the movie for themselves and that’s usually how the best outcome for any production is situated.

Meanwhile, Wreck-It Ralph 2 takes place in the freaking Internet!

Technically, the Internet was around when the now-retro games existed, but the trailers make it clear that the interpretation of the web is that of what’s going on today. Twitter! Snapchat! Amazon! Smartphones and tablets! They’re all here and in your face! There are no parodies of their logos or anything like that, either. Right as soon as Ralph and Vanellope make it to the movie’s take on the Internet, the product placement kicks off as blatantly as they could make it.

Actually, let’s backtrack for a second. What was Vanellope doing in the Fix-It Felix Jr.cabinet? Isn’t she unable to leave her game because she’s a glitch? Heck, where is everybody? Why are Ralph and Vanellope the only familiar characters we’ve seen so far? I get that these two have the most chemistry out of their interactions with anyone else, and maybe the film itself has scenes that answer these questions. Still, it feels weird going this far into promoting it without so much as seeing Felix show up for a second. They’re just gone as far as we can tell for now.

Back to the Internet talk, both trailers seem to just depict the duo screwing around with whatever they could find. I still know nothing about the plot because we’re not told anything other than “Hey, look at this thing!” This gets taken up to eleven when we see that they go to, of all things, a Disney website. They are promoting Disney properties and other Disney studios in a Disney film. The rest of the trailer shows these things off, from Stormtroopers chasing Vanellope to her encountering just about every Disney princess known to man and woman.

It’s all a bunch of silly shenanigans, sure, but do you see the problem? Not only are they trying to cram all the things today’s generation may connect to (and not the production team) but Disney is giving itself one big pat on the back with this chaotic display of their own properties shoehorned into a series that was once about neither the Internet nor established Disney characters. I can’t help but envision a bunch of executives dictating the entire thing. And there has been a lot of cases in recent years where executive meddling has been a complete hindrance to what could have been. Instead of being a love letter to retro games, they basically made Wreck-It Ralph a love letter to itself from itself.

To top off the idea of executives trying to pander to the modern demographic, the Disney princesses question if Vanellope was one of them. This scene opens up another can of worms by spelling out how the princesses are dependent on, in their words, “a big strong man”.

Feminism is a touchy subject when it comes to its portrayals. Ideally, it is meant to express the idea of equal rights for men and women. However, every time a female character in fictional media points out gender roles working against her, it gets immediately implied to the audience that she sees herself as inferior to the male characters rather than equal. She is written that way and given that personality by the studio. It annoys me how tone-deaf these productions get with the message, and this scene is no exception.

And let me get this straight, Disney and co.: You make the princesses list off all sort of things that happened to them, and you’re telling us that it’s the moviegoers’ fault they are seen as worthless? Give me a freakin’ break! You made the movies they starred in, not us. Vanellope answering in agreement to that she was dependent on Ralph is the cherry on top of it all; excuse me, the reason why she needed Ralph’s help in the first movie wasn’t because she was a girl, Disney. If that’s the case, she could have built her go-kart and test track herself, and take on other spoiler-y things that wouldn’t have been resolved without the goddamn title character.

All in all, I don’t think I’ll be seeing Wreck-It Ralph 2. This trailer let me know what the movie’s going to be like: Without the spirit or heart that made the first one good. I understand writing over a thousand words about a trailer sounds silly, but these are just the kind of vibes I’ve been getting from it.

  • Watching: Ed Edd n Eddy
  • Playing: Sonic Forces
ticgamesnetwork.com/reviews/pa…

Earlier in the year, Pac-Man: Championship Edition 2+ graced the Nintendo Switch as the folks at Bandai Namco have continued their support for the console. I remember when it was initially announced, and thought the trailer looked so darn cool. My hype faded when I realized I had nothing to play the game on. It dropping onto the Switch was fantastic news, and surely enough, I picked up the game when it came out. I wish there was a physical release like the Playstation 4 and Xbox One versions, but just having this title is enough to satisfy me.

I am one of the biggest Pac-Man fans I know; I’ve followed the franchise since playing the Ms. Pac-Man/Galaga arcade cabinet at a bowling alley, and I’ve since owned all sorts of Namco compilations and entries like the Pac-Man World series among other games the yellow guy starred in. While his outings aren’t as consistent in structure as Marioand Sonic, I always look forward to what comes next. I’ve already heard good things about Championship Edition 2 when it came out on platforms, though, so my interest was already there prior to my purchase. I still am personally waiting for a Pac-Man World 4 to exist, but who am I to pass up on some good ol’ arcade-style fun?

Graphics

I don’t know who thought to turn Pac-Man into a neon paradise back in 2007, The people that came up with it sure had the right idea. Pac-Man: Championship Edition 2+ is a visual wonderland of glitzy walls and mesmerizing motion. If you grow a little tired of this look, there are many other graphical change-ups that can show up in Adventure and be applied in Score Attack. This ranges from styles inspired by Pac-Mania and Galaga to other cool ways Pac-Man and the ghosts could be envisioned. There are no Ghostly Adventures themes though; thank goodness for that.

Audio

I’m not always terribly fond of games that stick with a single genre of music, but Pac-Man: Championship Edition 2+ knocks the score out of the freakin’ park! This game boasts a techno-induced soundtrack and I love it to death. There are variations of each song that go up to ten whole minutes, and I willingly listen the whole way through because they are so amazingly catchy. In-game, the music goes perfectly well with the neon flair and speedy chaos. Outside the game, it’s like a rave is going off in my head and I don’t want to put an end to it. 

The classic sound effects also return in full force, with some subtle echoes added to mix it with the techno theme the game is coated in. A special mention goes to the ghost-chomping, because there is nothing more satisfying in this game than hearing this sound repeatedly go off in rapid succession.

Gameplay

On its surface, Pac-Man: Championship Edition 2+ continues the idea of its predecessor. You are looking at a massively spruced up version of Pac-Man, and the way it is spruced up is via a giant emphasis on fast-paced score chasing coated with a rad techno style. However, the game structures itself differently in a way that gives it its own special feel. The game’s speed is a lot faster in general; the arcade games feel like they move at a snail’s pace compared to this (barring the fact some cabinets are set so Pac moves really fast).

You start out eating up dots like usual, but doing so fills up a meter that – when filled it triggers a fruit or a Power Pellet to appear. There are four long chains of ghosts, but bumping into them doesn’t hurt due to how fast everything is. Only if the head ghost is annoyed by the bumping does it become an object you desperately need to avoid. The real threat in this game is the timer. In a way, bumping into ghosts is still a problem if it means taking precious seconds off your run. Fortunately, the elements are balanced in a way that provides a kinetic rhythm for players to follow along. Keeping this rhythm going is the name of the game, and Championship Edition 2+ wears this formula strongly.

There are also plenty of ways this formula can be experienced. The Score Attack is the highlight of the bunch, but Adventure Mode has a big dose of levels for the hardcore players to tackle. This Switch version adds multiplayer modes for two people to take on together, but I don’t have anyone else that’d play this with me, let alone one that would react as accordingly as the game demands. However anyone plays, the way it’s played remains the same: Pac-Man on hyper speed with all the aforementioned gameplay elements that come to fruition. It isn’t flawless; some Adventure levels can be a little too demanding for their own good while the boss battles are pretty lame. The core gameplay is too great to have things like that deter its staying power.

Verdict

Pac-Man: Championship Edition 2 is a great modern take on the classic arcade formula. It’s intense, it’s addicting, and it’s really fun! Frustration may kick in when being unable to reach a certain goal or score, but mastering the rhythm of the game’s neon mazes proves to be ultimately rewarding. It’s also an ideal fit for the Switch; the portable, accessible nature of the console makes it so much easier to kill some time by racking up points.

Copy purchased by reviewer

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Ryan Silberman
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Hullo everyone! :dummy: My name is Ryan, and I'm a total enthusiast for video games and cartoons alike. I'm also an aspiring indie game developer and/or cartoonist, as you can see. :meow:

Since May 2016, I have become a gaming journalist for The Inner Circle Games Network. You can find an archive of all my articles (reviews, opinions, news, etc) through this link:
www.ticgn.com/author/ryansilbe…

I'm still longing for an audience (and........I guess Watchers for that matter....), but nevertheless I try my best to reach out to the public and deliver a slice of goodness through my ability to develop fun games and my knowledge of video games and cartoons in general! :D

To check out my games I've created, you may go here! :la:
gamejolt.com/profile/jack-of-a…

I also have Android games on Google Play! :la:
play.google.com/store/apps/dev…

My Skype: ryan.silberman90
My Steam: Ryan Silberman
My YouTube: Ryan S.
My Twitter: RyanSilberman
My discord: RyanSil
My picarto: RyanSilberman

Nintendo Switch friend code: SW-7091-8263-8044

Anyway, I suppose that's all I have to ramble about. Take a look around, and enjoy your time here on my page and/or the many varied submissions I have lurking around here!
Interests

Critiques


I'd call this reboot style, but really, technically this style can no longer really be considered the "reboot" style since the new Powe...


Whatever it was that got you to draw something like this, you may as well keep at that! Those must have been some powerful Pokemon remi...


I don't watch My Little Pony or follow the series in general, so I can't possibly be considered a "brony". However, this flash file is ...

by Memoski

This picture makes me realize how big indie gaming has become. Not only has it provided people as seemingly insignificant as you and I ...

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Comments


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:iconnickittycata:
NicKittyCata Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hi there
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:iconryansilberman:
RyanSilberman Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hi
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:iconnickittycata:
NicKittyCata Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Long time no see. How are ya?
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:iconryansilberman:
RyanSilberman Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I've been good.
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(1 Reply)
:iconsuparmarkeogai996:
suparmarkeogai996 Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2018
do you know pvz ?
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:iconryansilberman:
RyanSilberman Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, but I don't play any of the games.
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:iconplayfuldeadinc:
playfuldeadinc Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2018  Student General Artist
Thanks for the fave!
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:iconryansilberman:
RyanSilberman Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
You're more than welcome!
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:iconmakatoons:
Makatoons Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy Birthday!
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:icongreyhatgraphics:
GreyHatGraphics Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2017  Student
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